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3 tips for powerful storytelling that you can use for products and companies

Picture yourself sitting in a circle around a campfire. One of your friends is telling a story, you lean in, you’re captivated. Why? Picture yourself sitting in a circle around a campfire with your closest friends. One of your friends is telling a story, you lean in, you’re captivated. What is it a
3 tips for powerful storytelling that you can use for products and companies
Little Red Riding Hood. Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

3 tips for powerful storytelling that you can also use to talk about products

Picture yourself sitting in a circle around a campfire with your closest friends. One of your friends is telling a story, you lean in, you’re captivated. What is it about that story is drawing you in?

The art to telling an incredible story about your business or product is very similar to telling a story around a campfire. They all have these common elements.

  1. A protagonist.
  2. An emotional journey.
  3. A question to be answered (a mystery).
https://storyteller.productmaestro.com

1. A Protagonist

Every story needs a hero. It’s gentle little Red Riding Hood visiting her grandmother in the woods, or it’s rambunctious Peter Pan who never wants to grow up. If you’re a product or brand, your story still needs a protagonist. There are many ways to approach this. In my experience crafting narratives with clients, it all depends on your brand approach. Maybe you have a productivity product with a mascot and he’s the protagonist, out to save the world from terrible time-wasters. Or maybe a customer story can form the basis of your protagonist. Do some brainstorming, and figure this out.

2. An emotional journey

One example of an emotional journey is Overcoming the Monster. American movies love this narrative. Little Red Riding Hood is a good example. There’s the good — little red riding hood, and there’s the bad — the big bad wolf. The good encounters evil and overcomes it. There is nothing more satisfying. And this is but one of many journey types. What’s your story’s emotional journey?

3. A question to be answered (a mystery)

Building tension is a great way to get your audience’s attention. Your stage and video presence can build this tension when you start with silence. Within your narrative you can build this tension too, by starting with a question. For example, throw up a slide of a river and say “Why do 30 people jump into this river in Egypt each year?” This might be a metaphor for a point you’re making. Just remember not to answer right away. Keep the tension alive by answering towards the end.

Knowing your own Storyteller type is the first step to unlocking your story superpowers. 🌟 Want to know what your storyteller type is? Find out for free at https://storyteller.productmaestro.com


Product Maestro helps you tell powerful stories about products and companies. Our Storytelling classes are designed for CEOs and Product Leaders who want to up-level their storytelling abilities. www.productmaestro.com